The Burden of Ambiguity

Writing at a Cooperative
Avery Edenfield

[Editor's note: The paper below, by cooperative researcher Avery Edenfield, is considerably more 'academic' than our usual fare.  However, the topic is one that should be of keen interest to cooperators, as it provides some useful insights about where and when ambiguity in our bylaws and operating agreements can be usefully employed, and where it should be avoided.  Avery has also written a summary of his research on writing in cooperatives for a more general audience, and provided some best practices for cooperators, in his article Documents are Social Actions.]

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About the author: 

Avery C. Edenfield is an assistant professor in Technical Communication and Rhetoric at Utah State University. Avery researches professional communication in cooperatives, collectives, and nonprofits. He has hosted several workshops on writing, including at the NASCO 2016 Institute and the 2017 ACE Institute. Avery is a member of several cooperatives and has been involved in cooperative development and governance since 2012. He has published on writing in cooperatives in the Journal of Technical Writing and CommunicationTechnical Communication, and Nonprofit Quarterly.

Publication Date: 
Friday, March 9, 2018